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Shalom = hello and goodbye in Hebrew

Shalom = hello and goodbye in Hebrew

Dana says hello and goodbye in Hebrew. Shalom!
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Dhanya vad = thank you in Hindi

Dhanya vad = thank you in Hindi

Manish Sharma returns to say thank you in Hindi.
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Děkuji = thank you in Czech

Děkuji = thank you in Czech

Dana Gornitzki, Editor of MIEN Magazine, says thank you in Czech. This is in first person and is pronounced dyeh-kuh-yi.
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The NW2 shuffle (handshake) - a picture guide

The NW2 shuffle (handshake) - a picture guide

Londoner and Proprietor of Personal Stylist in London Sudarshan Raj Singh sent in this lovely picture guide to a street handshake called the NW2 Shuffle. Try it with a friend!
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Namaste = Greetings in Hindi

Namaste = Greetings in Hindi

Manish Sharma from London says Namaste - along with showing the appropriate gesture. Literally translated, Namaste means "I bow to you".
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Herzlich willkommen = welcome in German

Herzlich willkommen = welcome in German

Lena Weber, Editor and Founder of the Style High Club and the Vintage Guide to London welcomes everyone with a smile.
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The Olympics: Never a better time to be polite and genteel

The Olympics: Never a better time to be polite and genteel

In case you've not been on the interwebs, watching the news, reading a newspaper or walking on the streets: the Olympics kick off in London today. The bells have already rung here in Blighty and we are ready to go. Yes, it will take longer to get everywhere and we will be far cosier with more gentlepeople about. However, here at MIEN headquarters, we refuse to be curmudgeonly. It is time to embrace the Olympic spirit. People from all over the world are in one place together to compete for their countries, while so many are cheering and supporting - at stadia or virtually. It is a beautiful thing, is it not?  So, let us take this opportunity to be kind and polite. Say hello, welcome, excuse me (if you've done something wrong) and enjoy this incredible moment. This is exactly why it is the perfect time to invite you - our lovely gentlereaders - to share mannerly gestures from your own cultures and locales.  Why not learn how to be warm-hearted and courteous in other languages? We will post a few examples to begin with and then invite you to do the same. Simply, take a photograph with the word (i.e.; thank you, thumbs up, awesome) and appropriate gesture if necessary (and don't be cheeky!), then email it to us at info@mienmagazine.com. Please include your name, language and location. You can take a photograph with your camera phone, webcam or regular camera - just make sure the resolution is high enough that we can feature it here on MIEN Magazine. Please feel free to include a couple of people to demonstrate an action or word that requires more than two people - let's make this exercise in politeness an enjoyable one. Welcome, bienvenue, aloha, shagotom, svāgat, baruch haba and benvenuti! And ps we'll be on Twitter and Facebook with #mienolympics
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High five

High five

This "high five" gesture is often associated with people from the North Americas. The "high five" is performed when two or more people want to express their glee for their own or others' successes. No doubt, we shall see many high fives when medals are won and records are broken. Anna and David perform this motion beautifully - just take a good look to see how it's done.
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Thumbs up

Thumbs up

Debbie is a Canadian lady who lives in London. Here, she shows us how to do a "thumbs up" - a common gesture in different cultures. It means: "nice one", "awesome" or "yes, I like it!"
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Excuse me

Excuse me

This word will come in handy as streets will no doubt be crowded during the Olympics. It is important to mind your manners and say excuse me. You will get a kinder response and be on your way in no time at all.
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